Time for Three @ Punahou

tf3-suzuki-workshop

Monday, Sept. 26
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Montague Hall Orchestra Room

Inspiring students of all ages, Time for Three will present a workshop or the Punahou Music School Suzuki Program. Time for Three, the self-described “classically-trained
garage band,” will visit Punahou as  artists-in-residence September 26 and 28. The trio performs music from Bach to Brahms and beyond, including originals from their own arrangements of everything from bluegrass and folk tunes to ingenious mash-ups of popular hits.

 

Not All Practice Makes Perfect

“But while the abilities are extraordinary, there is no mystery at all about how these people developed them. They practiced. A lot.”

“Purposeful practice has several characteristics that set it apart from what we might call “naive practice,” which is essentially just doing something

repeatedly, and expecting that the repetition alone will improve one’s performance.”

http://nautil.us/issue/35/boundaries/not-all-practice-makes-perfect

Itzhak Perlman At 70

from NPR:

“A lot of people ask me, ‘What is your goal now that you have done everything?’ And I always say that my goal is to not be bored by what I do,” Perlman says. “The only way that I cannot be bored by what I do

is if I play something and it’s all new to me.”

http://www.npr.org/sections/deceptivecadence/2015/11/23/456781573/my-goal-is-to-not-be-bored-by-what-i-do-itzhak-perlman-at-70

still the greatest gift

Music Lessons Were the Best Thing Your Parents Ever Did for You, According to Science

Psychological studies continue to uncover more and more benefits that music lessons provide to developing minds. One incredibly comprehensive longitudinal study, produced by the German Socio-Economic Panel in 2013, stated the power of music lessons as plain as could be: “Music improves cognitive and non-cognitive skills more than twice as much

as sports, theater or

dance.” The study found that kids who take music lessons “have better cognitive skills and school grades and are more conscientious, open and ambitious.” And that’s just the beginning.

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